This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, a Boy Steward from East London in the Merchant Navy, a member of the 9th Black Watch from Perth and two brothers, born in Dublin who were in the Durham Light Infantry and the Border Regiment. Click on the Description Headings to discover more on their lives.

Herbert Alfred Thomas Scott – Merchant Navy Identification © The National Archives

S.S. Lusitania

Herbert was born in Poplar, East London. It appears that he lied about his age and joined the Merchant Navy in 1915 and went on to serve aboard the S.S. Lusitania a collier vessel as a Boy Steward. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Badge of the Durham Light Infantry.

Professional Soldier

Louis Alcock was born in Dublin in 1887 to a father who was in the military. He joined the Durham Light Infantry in 1903 when he was underage and was to serve as a Professional Soldier. He left the service in 1911 where he was to become a Policeman until the outbreak of war in 1914, when he was to return to service and transfer to France in September of the same year. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Grave of Thomas Kerr and his widow- © Kerr Family

Perth Dyer

Thomas Kerr, was born in the city of Perth, Scotland in 1888, where he was educated and brought-up and where he was to find employment as a Dyer in the local Dye Works. He was to serve in the Great War as a member of the 9th Battalion, Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) until September 1917 when he was tragically killed in a working party. To find out more about his story, click the above heading.

Alexander Francis Alcock – © Nottingham Evening Post

Kruiseik Hill

Alexander Francis Alcock was born in Ireland to a father who was in the military and a mother local to Ireland. As a Professional Soldier in the 2nd Border Regiment having joined in 1902, Sergeant Drummer Alexander Alcock was one of the first to be sent to the British Expeditionary Force. In October 1914, his unit was facing the enemy at Kruiseik, Belgium. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, a member of the West Ham Pals ‘The Hammers’ who was born in Lewisham, two brothers from the 6th Gordon Highlanders born in Aberlour, Banffshire and a member of the Australian Infantry who came from New South Wales. Click on the Description Headings to discover more on their lives.

Grave of Charles Andrew Payne.

The Hammers

Charles Andrew Payne was born at Manchester, Lancashire. In 1915 he joined the 13th Essex Regiment, the West Ham Pals and later found himself in France. During the winter of 1916 he was involved in a misadventure with some of his other colleagues. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Chapeltown of Glenlivet, Roman Catholic Church – ©Vincent Stuart

The Maze

Robert George Stuart was born at Glenlivet, Banffshire into a poor farming family. At 17 years old, he emigrated to Australia where he soon found himself a member of the 19th Battalion Australian Infantry on the outbreak of the Great War. Following a stint at Gallipoli, where he was slightly wounded, he entered the war at Flanders. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Alexander James Watt

Battle of Loos

Alexander James Watt, was born at Aberlour, Banffshire into a farming family, and was the eldest of four boys. He was to enter the French Theatre of War in 1914 and later he was involved in the Battle of Loos in the Machine Gun section in support of the French. To find out more about his story, click the above heading.

Grave of William Watt – © © International War Graves Project

2nd Battle of the Scarpe

William Watt was born at Aberlour, Banffshire. He entered the French Theatre of War on the same day as his brother in 1914. They were both members of the 6th Gordon Highlanders. In April 1917, he was to find himself involved in the Second Battle of the Scarpe as part of the Arras Offensive. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, a member of the West Ham Pals ‘The Hammers’ who was born in Lewisham, a Navy Commander and his wife who had been residing on the Isle of Wight and a Canadian born nurse who was working in a Canadian Stationary Hospital. Click on the Description Headings to discover more on their lives.

Henry Thomas Gartside-Tipping

Veteran

Henry Thomas Gartside-Tipping was born at Dublin. He joined the navy at a young age in 1860. At the outbreak of the Great War he re-joined the navy from retirement where he was to be ultimately given command of an armoured yacht. This would lead him to be one of the oldest casualties in the navy. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Katherine Maud Mary MacDonald

Air Raid

Canadian born Katherine MacDonald who was a trained nurse was determined to be sent to France to serve in a Military Hospital. There she served in No 10 Canadian Stationary Hospital where she was involved in a German air raid. To find out more about her story click on the above heading.

Frank Arthur Jenns

A West Ham Pal

Frank Arthur Jenns, was born at Lewisham, London and was one of nine children. Working as a Builders Clerk when he joined the West Ham Pals, The 13th Essex Regiment in 1915. Frank was to turn into an exceptional soldier and soon found himself commissioned. To find out more about his story, click the above heading.

Grave of Mary Stuart Gartside-Tipping – © Canaryguy (Find a Grave)

Women’s Emergency Corps

Mary Gartside-Tipping was born in Blackburn, Lancashire. She joined the Women’s Emergency Corps and went to assist in France following the death of her husband who was in the navy. While there she was involved in an incident with a French soldier in a cafe she was working in. To find out more about her story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, an Able-Seaman from Canning Town, London, a Sergeant from Bexhill, Sussex in the 6th East Kent Regiment and two brothers from Dronfield, Derbyshire who were in the 28th London Regiment and the Sherwood Foresters.. Click on the Description Headings to discover more on their lives.

William Alfred Harden Dennett

The Buffs

William Dennett was born at Bexhill, Sussex. After completing his studies, he was to take up the position of assistant master at St Leonards School, Hythe. On the outbreak of the war he could have obtained a commission, however, he wished to go to the Front sooner. Unfortunately he was to be involved in a training accident while a member of the the 6th East Kent Regiment. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Thomas Edward Craft

The Hood

Able Seaman Thomas Edward Craft was born at Canning Town, London. He joined the navy in 1915 as a boy aged 14 years, just short of his 15th birthday. Serving for the remainder of The Great War he was to see action in World War Two. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Frederick Rotheram Cecil.

Lord of the Manor

Frederick Rotheram Cecil, was born at Knightsbridge, London although his wealthy family was from Dronfield, Derbyshire. He was 2 years old and the eldest child when his father died in 1894, and when he reached the appropriate age became Lord of the Manor. In December 1915 Frederick was to join the Artists Rifles as a Private soldier. To find out more about his story, click the above heading.

Rotheram Bagshawe Cecil

The Somme

2nd Lieutenant Rotheram Bagshawe Cecil was born at Southwold, Suffolk to a wealthy family who were from Dronfield, Derbyshire. Shortly after leaving Tonbridge School, Kent, he was to join the 5th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters, where he was to take part in the attack on the Gommecourt Salient as part of the Battle of the Somme. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, a member of the Women’s Legion from Berkshire, an officer from the 6th East Kent Regiment, a Royal Engineer from Aberdeen and a member of the 3rd London Regiment from Chelsea. Click on the Description Headings to discover more on their lives.

Norman Wreford Birkett

The Buffs

Norman Wreford Birkett was born at Chislehurst, Kent. After completing his studies, he was to move to Canada and on the outbreak of war joined the 8th Canadian Infantry. He was to transfer to the 6th East Kent Regiment where he was injured in an attack. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

James Frederick Sandham

Neuve Chapelle

Serjeant James Frederick Chapelle, known as Frederick was born at Chelsea, London and had previously been a Printer prior to the war. On joining the 3rd London Regiment he was to find himself in Malta before heading to France where his unit was to join the Indian Army Corps. He was to take part in the Battle of Neuve Chapelle on the 10th March 1915. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Women’s Legion Badge: © IWM – (INS 7778)

Women’s Legion

Kathleen Wells or Birkett, was born and brought up in Appleton, Berkshire, and had belonged to a reasonably well off family. At the start of the Great War she was to join the Women’s Legion and acted as a driver within that organisation before moving into the Women’s Royal Air Force in 1918. To find out more about her story, click the above heading.

James Cruickshank

Blairgowrie

Sapper James Cruickshank was born at Old Machar, Aberdeen where he was employed within a sawmill. On enlisting into the army he was to join the Royal Engineers. It is believed that he did not serve in a foreign field but spent all his time within the U.K. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, a member of the Nelson Battalion, Royal Naval Division from Dundee, a Private in the Royal Army Medical Corps from Reading, an Argentinian born officer on attachment to the Royal Flying Corps from the 1st London Yeomanry and a 2nd Corporal of the Special Brigade of the Royal Engineers in a Gassing Company. Click on the Description Headings to discover more on their lives.

Harry Chalmers – © Neil Bright

Ancre Attack

Harry Chalmers was born in Dundee and worked as a Clerk in a Jute Mill prior to his enlistment in the Royal Naval Division. Following his training he was promoted to Petty Officer and went on to fight in the last battles of the Somme in an attempt to capture Beaumont-Hamel. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Robert Aldridge

Murdered

Robert Aldridge was born in Reading, Berkshire and had previously been a hospital Porter prior to the war. He was to volunteer to enter service in the Royal Army Medical Corps and served throughout the war in the United Kingdom. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Livens Projector – © IWM ORD 26

Special Engineer

Charles Lyons, was born and brought up in Keresley, Coventry, Warwickshire, he had been a Farm Labourer prior to the Great War when he joined the Royal Artillery. He was soon to transfer to the Royal Engineers where he was involved in the distribution of Poison Gas. To find out more about his story, click the above heading.

Sidney Stewart Hume

Mental Health

Sidney Stewart Hume was born in Argentina where he was to become a farmer. He was to travel back to the U.K. at the start of the war where he joined the 1st County of London Yeomanry and served in the Gallipoli Campaign. He later transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and was later captured by the enemy in France and served some time in various camps where his mental health difficulties came to light and became serious. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, a Canadian Pilot attached to the Royal Flying Corps, a Lance/Corporal 10th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment soldier, a naval Captain of H.M.S. Natal and a Corporal of the Special Brigade of the Royal Engineers in a Gassing Company. Click on the Description Headings to discover more on their lives.

Jacob Ernest Mott

Canadian Pilot

Jacob Ernest Mott was an Ontario born Canadian. He enlisted into the Canadian Medical Corps on November 1914. Commissioned in May 1916 to the Royal Irish Fusiliers, he was to stay with them for just over a year before being attached to the Royal Flying Corps. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Eric Percy Coventry Back

Cromarty Disaster

Eric Percy Coventry Back was born in Torquay, Devon and was a professional naval officer and took command of his first ship on June 1915. Tragically he was to be killed along with his wife on the Cromarty Firth in north Scotland. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Arthur William Bull

Christmas Day

Arthur William Bull from Watford, Hertfordshire was 25 years old when he was in the trenches in the Ferme du Bois sector on Christmas Eve. During the night an artillery duel took place to stop Christmas Day fraternisation. To find out more about his story, click the above heading.

Robert Bennet McBey – © Allan McBey

Gas Gas Gas

Robert Bennet McBey was a Miner, working in the pits of Lanarkshire when he answered the call to arms in January 1915. Initially a member of the Artillery, he later moved to the Special Brigade of the Royal Engineers for the use of Poison Gas. He was wounded in October 1918 and for his actions was awarded the Military Medal. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, a volunteer nurse from Kent, a New Zealander serving in Gallipoli, a Private of the Royal Army Medical Corps from Burnley, Lancashire and a Lieutenant in The Royal Scots Fusiliers serving in Yorkshire. Click on the Description Headings to discover more on their lives.

Private William Nutter, Royal Army Medical Corps

Prisoner of War

William Nutter was a Fitters Labourer on the Trams in Burnley when he enlisted in October 1915 into the Royal Army Medical Corps where he served in the 76th Field Ambulance. Arriving in France in August 1916 he was later injured by an explosion which caused a wound to his buttock. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Edgar Hunter Ewen from the Aberdeen University Roll of Service.

Catterick Camp

Edgar Hunter Ewen was a teacher at Troon in Ayrshire prior to his service in the Great War, initially he was a Serjeant in the Gordon Highlanders before being commissioned into The Royal Scots Fusiliers. While acting as an instructor at Catterick Camp, North Yorkshire he was involved in a fatal accident. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Garland Oswald Morgan

A Sapper In Gallipoli

Garland Oswald Morgan was a 22 year old New Zealander from St. Albans a suburb of Christchurch on the South Island of New Zealand when he volunteered for duty at the start of the Great War. He was enlisted into a Signals Company of a New Zealand Engineers unit and was to make his way via Egypt to the Gallipoli Peninsula along with so many other ANZACs’. To find out more about his story, click the above heading.

Miss M J Birkett, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died December 1914 16 December 1914. Copyright: © IWM (WWC H2-131-A).

Exhausted

Margaret Janson Birkett was a member of her Red Cross, Voluntary Aid Detachment at Chislehurst, Kent when she fell ill after working long hours to attend to the patients. To find out more about her story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

The Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives are, a Balloonist in the Flying Corps, a Royal Scot War Hero, a Naval ‘Destroyer’ Officer and a Warwickshire Yeomanry Shoeing-Smith. Click on the Description Heading to discover more on their lives.

Patrick Nangle, 1st Royal Scots

Military Medal

Patrick Nangle had a tough upbringing in Edinburgh. When he left school he joined The Royal Scots in 1906 aged 16 years. He went on to serve both in the Great War where he was awarded the Military Medal and the Croix de Guerre, and WWII. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Family Grave at Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex – © Steve Grimwood (Find a Grave)

Christmas Day

Herbert Dudley Pashley was from Norfolk and a Professional Soldier having served previously as a Legal Clerk. Serving with The 23rd London Regiment, he was to transfer to the Royal Flying Corps in July 1916. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Letter of Explanation

Submarine Attack

Frank Wallis was a young officer in the Royal Navy when he was allocated to the ship H.M.S. Pasley a new Destroyer. During his service on this vessel it was involved in a friendly fire incident with the British Submarine G9. He was later transferred to the Coastal Motor Boat ’33A’ which was involved in an attack on Zeebrugge and Ostend. To find out more of his story, click the above heading.

Warwickshire Yeomanry Cap Badge

A Blacksmith at War

Wallace Stacey was from Westonzoyland, Somerset where he had been a Blacksmith. He was to join the Warwickshire Yeomanry as a Shoeing Smith, where he found himself in Egypt in 1917 attached to the 5th Mounted Brigade, Australian Mounted Division. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

This Weeks New Research

There are Four new research pages this week in WW1 Lives, a Balloon Observer, a Royal Artillery War Hero, a Royal Scot and a Royal Dragoon from Bedfordshire. Click on the Description Heading to discover more on their lives.

British Kite Balloon © Air Force Museum of New Zealand

An Observer

Stanley Craigmore Pinhay from Falmouth, Devon had a career in the Post Office prior to the Great War, Following his attestation into the Royal Flying Corps, he eventually found himself as an observer, suspended beneath a balloon in a wicker basket. To find out more of his story click the above heading.

Cap Badge of 1st Royal Dragoons

A Double Serjeant-Major

Ernest James Buck who was from Biggleswade, Bedfordshire was a Professional Soldier having served in India and South Africa before the Great War in the 1st Royal Dragoons. Serving early in France he was later transferred to the 17th Royal Scots. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.

Grave of Alexander Mann – © Philippe Degroote

Returned Home to Fight

Alexander Mann had been in America for four years, and came back to Scotland on the outbreak of hostilities, He was recently married and was about to adopt his wife’s first born son when he was killed in an attack by the 11th Royal Scots on the enemy trenches. To find out more of his story, click the above heading.

Anthony Chaworth-Musters.

A Chaworth-Muster

Anthony Chaworth-Musters was from a notable English family. He was was educated at Rugby School before gaining a commission in the Royal Field Artillery prior to the Great War. At the start of hostilities he was sent onto the continent and was soon in the think of the fighting. To find out more about his story click on the above heading.